Tagged: social

Tactical Technology Collective | Turning information into action

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Tactical Tech is an organisation dedicated to the use of information in activism.

We focus on the use of data, design and technology in campaigning through our Evidence & Action programme and on helping activists understand and manage their digital security and privacy risks through our Privacy & Expression programme.

We also provide services through our creative agency for advocacy, Tactical Studios.

Use this site to browse all our toolkits and guides, watch our films, find out about our trainings and events, read the latest news and learn more about our work.

See on www.tacticaltech.org

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Study: Mobile news “snacking” is up sharply, but tablets are the killer news devices

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People are turning to their mobile devices to read news more often than ever before, but they’re spending less time in news apps each time they do so, according to new figures from mobile and Web a…

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Jeff Bezos buys the Washington Post and the media industry goes back to the future

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Jeff Bezos’s acquisition of the Washington Post is another sign of how the mass media industry is shifting back to an earlier model — and if anyone can figure out how to make that model work in a digital age, it’s probably Jeff Bezos.

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How to get started as a multimedia journalist

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I’ve now covered almost all of the 5 roles in an investigations team I posted about earlier this year – apart from the multimedia journalist role. So here’s how to get started in that role.

Multimedia journalism is a pretty nebulous term. As a result, in my experience, when students try to adopt the role two main problems recur: 1) having a narrow assumption of what multimedia means (i.e. video) and 2) not being able to see the multimedia possibilities of your work.

Multimedia journalism is a very different beast to broadcast journalism. In broadcast journalism your role was comparatively simple: you had one medium to use, and a well-worn format to employ.

Put another way: in broadcast journalism the medium was imposed on the story; in multimedia journalism, the story imposes the medium.

Multimedia also has to deal with the style challenge I’ve written about previously:

“Not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.”

With that in mind, then, here are 4 steps to get started in multimedia journalism:

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Thanks to the web, journalism is now something you do — not something you are

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The fact that it is more difficult than ever to decide who qualifies as a “journalist” may make for a confusing media landscape, and it may trouble some professional journalists and media outlets, but in the long run we are better off.

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The danger of journalism that moves too quickly beyond fact | Poynter.

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The best thinking about journalism’s future benefits from its being in touch with technology’s potential. But it can get in its own way when it simplifies and repudiates the intelligence of journalism’s past.

That is happening, to a degree, in a discussion gaining momentum lately that journalism should now largely move beyond fact gathering and toward synthesis and interpretation.

The NSA story is just the latest case that shows the importance, and the elusiveness, of simply knowing what has really happened.

In a Nieman Journalism Lab post, Jonathan Stray made the case recently for moving beyond facts, or what might be called The Displacement Theory of Journalism. “The Internet has solved the basic distribution of event-based facts in a variety of ways; no one needs a news organization to know what the White House is saying when all press briefings are posted on YouTube. What we do need is someone to tell us what it means.”…

See on www.poynter.org

Why Social Media Isn ‘ t Doing For Us What London’s Coffee Houses Did For … – Forbes

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Why Social Media Isn’t Doing For Us What London’s Coffee Houses Did For …

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