Tagged: ipad

How the Internet Can Save Journalism | Ackerman & Ayres Blog | Huff Post

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The sale of the Washington Post to Jeff Bezos is just the most recent episode in the decline and fall of professional journalism. By selling out to a mega-billionaire without any newspaper experience, the Graham family has put a priceless national asset at the mercy of a single outsider. Perhaps Jeff Bezos will use his new plaything responsibly; perhaps not; if not, one of the few remaining sources of serious journalism will be lost.

The crisis in the English-speaking world will turn into a catastrophe in smaller language zones. The English-speaking market is so large that advertisers will pay a lot to gain access to the tens of millions of readers who regularly click onto the New York Times or the Guardian. But the Portuguese-reading public is far too small to support serious journalism on the internet. What happens to Portuguese democracy when nobody is willing to pay for old-fashioned newspapers?

The blogosphere can’t be expected to take up the slack. First-class reporting on national and international affairs isn’t for amateurs. It requires lots of training and lots of contacts and lots of expenses. It also requires reporters with the well-honed capacity to write for a broad audience — something that eludes the overwhelming majority of academic specialists and think-tank policy wonks. And it requires editors who recognize the need to maintain their organization’s long-term credibility when presenting the hot-button news of the day. The modern newspaper created the right incentives, but without a comparable business model for the new technology, blogging will degenerate into a postmodern nightmare — with millions spouting off without any concern for the facts.

We can’t afford to wait for the invisible hand to come up with a new way to provide economic support for serious journalism. To be sure, the financial press has proved moderately successful in persuading readers to pay for online access; and mainstream media are now trying to emulate this success. But if tens of millions of readers don’t succumb to the charms of PayPal — and quickly — now is the time for some creative thinking.

For starters, it would be a mistake to rely on a BBC-style solution. It is one thing for government to serve as a major source of news; quite another to give it a virtual monopoly on reporting. This could mean the death of critical fact-based inquiry when a demagogic government takes power — this risk is especially great in small language zones, where outside media can’t take up the slack.

Enter the Internet news voucher. Under our proposal, each news article on the web will end by asking readers whether it contributed to their political understanding. If so, they can click the yes-box, and send the message to a National Endowment for Journalism — which would obtain an annual appropriation from the government. This money would be distributed to news organizations on the basis of a strict mathematical formula: the more clicks, the bigger the check from the Endowment.

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See on www.huffingtonpost.com

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Jeff Bezos buys the Washington Post and the media industry goes back to the future

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Jeff Bezos’s acquisition of the Washington Post is another sign of how the mass media industry is shifting back to an earlier model — and if anyone can figure out how to make that model work in a digital age, it’s probably Jeff Bezos.

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The Transition to Digital Journalism | kdmcBerkeley

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Digital technology presents an often bewildering array of choices for journalists – producing slideshows and video, joining social networks and blogging, using map mashups and mobile devices. The list seems endless.

But survival requires understanding all these new technologies so journalists and news organizations can make informed decisions about why and how to utilize them (see Blogs, Tweets, Social Media, and the News Business, in Nieman Reports).

This guide covers the major digital tools and trends that are disrupting the news industry and changing the way journalists do their jobs.

See on multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu

How to get started as a multimedia journalist

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I’ve now covered almost all of the 5 roles in an investigations team I posted about earlier this year – apart from the multimedia journalist role. So here’s how to get started in that role.

Multimedia journalism is a pretty nebulous term. As a result, in my experience, when students try to adopt the role two main problems recur: 1) having a narrow assumption of what multimedia means (i.e. video) and 2) not being able to see the multimedia possibilities of your work.

Multimedia journalism is a very different beast to broadcast journalism. In broadcast journalism your role was comparatively simple: you had one medium to use, and a well-worn format to employ.

Put another way: in broadcast journalism the medium was imposed on the story; in multimedia journalism, the story imposes the medium.

Multimedia also has to deal with the style challenge I’ve written about previously:

“Not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.”

With that in mind, then, here are 4 steps to get started in multimedia journalism:

See on onlinejournalismblog.wordpress.com

How Newsrooms Can Adopt a Mobile-First Mindset | Mediashift | PBS

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First, it was the Web. Now, mobile is the “second tidal wave of change about to collide with the news industry,” said Cory Bergman, general manager of Breaking News, a mobile-first startup owned by NBC News Digital.

As more consumers access news on their mobile devices, news organizations are seeing traffic to their websites from desktop computers flatten or decline. And in some regions, such as many parts of Africa, users are leapfrogging the Web altogether and going straight to mobile.

Although many newsroom leaders believe a “mobile, too” approach — a focus on mobile in addition to other platforms — will be enough, that mentality is shortsighted, Bergman said in a recent Poynter Online chat.

Joining Bergman to discuss the news industry’s transition to mobile were Poynter’s Regina McCombs and Damon Kiesow, senior product manager for mobile at the Boston Globe and Boston.com.

See on www.pbs.org

Why Social Media Isn ‘ t Doing For Us What London’s Coffee Houses Did For … – Forbes

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Why Social Media Isn’t Doing For Us What London’s Coffee Houses Did For …

See on www.forbes.com

Vita da freelance: Come affrontare una sala stampa senza paura

La dura vita del giornalista e del feeelance: come affrontare una sala stampa senza paura? Confusione, sala affollata, caldo, e tempi strettissimi rendono difficile concentrarsi sulla conferenza stampa che dura pochi minuti… e in redazione aspettano il pezzo per chiudere la pagina? Con l’Ipad e Send fai una sola cosa: semplifichi. Send contiene l’essenziale per concentrasti solo sul testo per poi inviarlo direttamente ai sistemi editoriali dei giornali per cui lavori.