Tagged: editor

Tactical Technology Collective | Turning information into action

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Tactical Tech is an organisation dedicated to the use of information in activism.

We focus on the use of data, design and technology in campaigning through our Evidence & Action programme and on helping activists understand and manage their digital security and privacy risks through our Privacy & Expression programme.

We also provide services through our creative agency for advocacy, Tactical Studios.

Use this site to browse all our toolkits and guides, watch our films, find out about our trainings and events, read the latest news and learn more about our work.

See on www.tacticaltech.org

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If you REALLY want to be a journalist – you need the answers to these 10 questions | Multimedia Journalism

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The answers are designed to fully inform you about the state of the journalism trade today in the US and the UK.

See on www.multimedia-journalism.co.uk

Jeff Bezos buys the Washington Post and the media industry goes back to the future

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Jeff Bezos’s acquisition of the Washington Post is another sign of how the mass media industry is shifting back to an earlier model — and if anyone can figure out how to make that model work in a digital age, it’s probably Jeff Bezos.

See on gigaom.com

Journalism and media: Who’s watching the watchmen? |

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Reports on traditional news outlets, such as print and broadcast struggling to be financially viable. are nothing new. In a previous blog post, I quoted a statistic from IBM that claimed 90 per cent of all data has been created in the last two years alone.

With the rise of social media and the ability for anyone with access to a computer to create a blog, the supply of possible news sources has exploded since the web gained mainstream acceptance years ago.

The public’s demand for content and news has dramatically increased. However, the exponential growth in supply of news sources such as social media, 24-hour news channels, and everything in between, has created a glut of information effectively driving down the value of real news. This is essentially a supply-and-demand problem. Combined with disruptive technology and better methodologies for advertising, traditional media outlets have been forced to make changes to the ways in which they report and monetize news content.

See on www.mediamiser.com

5 Things Journalists and Musicians Have in Common

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On the surface, the news and music industries seem like completely different animals. With a closer look, though, you can see how the Web has thrown the entire media business into uncharted territory.

See on www.mediabistro.com

The Transition to Digital Journalism | kdmcBerkeley

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Digital technology presents an often bewildering array of choices for journalists – producing slideshows and video, joining social networks and blogging, using map mashups and mobile devices. The list seems endless.

But survival requires understanding all these new technologies so journalists and news organizations can make informed decisions about why and how to utilize them (see Blogs, Tweets, Social Media, and the News Business, in Nieman Reports).

This guide covers the major digital tools and trends that are disrupting the news industry and changing the way journalists do their jobs.

See on multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu

How to get started as a multimedia journalist

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I’ve now covered almost all of the 5 roles in an investigations team I posted about earlier this year – apart from the multimedia journalist role. So here’s how to get started in that role.

Multimedia journalism is a pretty nebulous term. As a result, in my experience, when students try to adopt the role two main problems recur: 1) having a narrow assumption of what multimedia means (i.e. video) and 2) not being able to see the multimedia possibilities of your work.

Multimedia journalism is a very different beast to broadcast journalism. In broadcast journalism your role was comparatively simple: you had one medium to use, and a well-worn format to employ.

Put another way: in broadcast journalism the medium was imposed on the story; in multimedia journalism, the story imposes the medium.

Multimedia also has to deal with the style challenge I’ve written about previously:

“Not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.”

With that in mind, then, here are 4 steps to get started in multimedia journalism:

See on onlinejournalismblog.wordpress.com