Tagged: app

5 tips for reporters entering the digital journalism world | Journalism.co.uk

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Sharing quality content with their audience, engaging with readers below the line and building their brand, these are just some of the tips for new journalists shared at a journalism event today.

Speaking at the NCTJ’s Journalism Skills Conference at Bournemouth University, a panel were asked to give advice to journalists, particularly those entering the field.

The panel featured Peter Bale, vice president and general manager of CNN International Digital; Pete Clifton, executive producer for MSN UK; and Liisa Rohumaa, a journalism lecturer at Bournemouth University…

See on www.journalism.co.uk

Study: Mobile news “snacking” is up sharply, but tablets are the killer news devices

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People are turning to their mobile devices to read news more often than ever before, but they’re spending less time in news apps each time they do so, according to new figures from mobile and Web a…

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Edizioni Native Digitali

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Dopo la chiusura pochi mesi fa del «The Daily», testata per tablet che nelle intenzioni avrebbe dovuto segnare l’inizio della rivoluzione editoriale, arriva ora la notizia di un altro fallimento. S…

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Journalism and media: Who’s watching the watchmen? |

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Reports on traditional news outlets, such as print and broadcast struggling to be financially viable. are nothing new. In a previous blog post, I quoted a statistic from IBM that claimed 90 per cent of all data has been created in the last two years alone.

With the rise of social media and the ability for anyone with access to a computer to create a blog, the supply of possible news sources has exploded since the web gained mainstream acceptance years ago.

The public’s demand for content and news has dramatically increased. However, the exponential growth in supply of news sources such as social media, 24-hour news channels, and everything in between, has created a glut of information effectively driving down the value of real news. This is essentially a supply-and-demand problem. Combined with disruptive technology and better methodologies for advertising, traditional media outlets have been forced to make changes to the ways in which they report and monetize news content.

See on www.mediamiser.com

5 Things Journalists and Musicians Have in Common

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On the surface, the news and music industries seem like completely different animals. With a closer look, though, you can see how the Web has thrown the entire media business into uncharted territory.

See on www.mediabistro.com

The Transition to Digital Journalism | kdmcBerkeley

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Digital technology presents an often bewildering array of choices for journalists – producing slideshows and video, joining social networks and blogging, using map mashups and mobile devices. The list seems endless.

But survival requires understanding all these new technologies so journalists and news organizations can make informed decisions about why and how to utilize them (see Blogs, Tweets, Social Media, and the News Business, in Nieman Reports).

This guide covers the major digital tools and trends that are disrupting the news industry and changing the way journalists do their jobs.

See on multimedia.journalism.berkeley.edu

How to get started as a multimedia journalist

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I’ve now covered almost all of the 5 roles in an investigations team I posted about earlier this year – apart from the multimedia journalist role. So here’s how to get started in that role.

Multimedia journalism is a pretty nebulous term. As a result, in my experience, when students try to adopt the role two main problems recur: 1) having a narrow assumption of what multimedia means (i.e. video) and 2) not being able to see the multimedia possibilities of your work.

Multimedia journalism is a very different beast to broadcast journalism. In broadcast journalism your role was comparatively simple: you had one medium to use, and a well-worn format to employ.

Put another way: in broadcast journalism the medium was imposed on the story; in multimedia journalism, the story imposes the medium.

Multimedia also has to deal with the style challenge I’ve written about previously:

“Not only must they be able to adapt their style for different types of reporting; not only must they be able to adapt for different brands; not only must they be able to adapt their style within different brands across multiple media; but they must also be able to adapt their style within a single medium, across multiple platforms: Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Flickr, YouTube, or anywhere else that their audiences gather.”

With that in mind, then, here are 4 steps to get started in multimedia journalism:

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How Newsrooms Can Adopt a Mobile-First Mindset | Mediashift | PBS

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First, it was the Web. Now, mobile is the “second tidal wave of change about to collide with the news industry,” said Cory Bergman, general manager of Breaking News, a mobile-first startup owned by NBC News Digital.

As more consumers access news on their mobile devices, news organizations are seeing traffic to their websites from desktop computers flatten or decline. And in some regions, such as many parts of Africa, users are leapfrogging the Web altogether and going straight to mobile.

Although many newsroom leaders believe a “mobile, too” approach — a focus on mobile in addition to other platforms — will be enough, that mentality is shortsighted, Bergman said in a recent Poynter Online chat.

Joining Bergman to discuss the news industry’s transition to mobile were Poynter’s Regina McCombs and Damon Kiesow, senior product manager for mobile at the Boston Globe and Boston.com.

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Thanks to the web, journalism is now something you do — not something you are

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The fact that it is more difficult than ever to decide who qualifies as a “journalist” may make for a confusing media landscape, and it may trouble some professional journalists and media outlets, but in the long run we are better off.

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The danger of journalism that moves too quickly beyond fact | Poynter.

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The best thinking about journalism’s future benefits from its being in touch with technology’s potential. But it can get in its own way when it simplifies and repudiates the intelligence of journalism’s past.

That is happening, to a degree, in a discussion gaining momentum lately that journalism should now largely move beyond fact gathering and toward synthesis and interpretation.

The NSA story is just the latest case that shows the importance, and the elusiveness, of simply knowing what has really happened.

In a Nieman Journalism Lab post, Jonathan Stray made the case recently for moving beyond facts, or what might be called The Displacement Theory of Journalism. “The Internet has solved the basic distribution of event-based facts in a variety of ways; no one needs a news organization to know what the White House is saying when all press briefings are posted on YouTube. What we do need is someone to tell us what it means.”…

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