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Tactical Technology Collective | Turning information into action

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Tactical Tech is an organisation dedicated to the use of information in activism.

We focus on the use of data, design and technology in campaigning through our Evidence & Action programme and on helping activists understand and manage their digital security and privacy risks through our Privacy & Expression programme.

We also provide services through our creative agency for advocacy, Tactical Studios.

Use this site to browse all our toolkits and guides, watch our films, find out about our trainings and events, read the latest news and learn more about our work.

See on www.tacticaltech.org

5 tips for reporters entering the digital journalism world | Journalism.co.uk

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Sharing quality content with their audience, engaging with readers below the line and building their brand, these are just some of the tips for new journalists shared at a journalism event today.

Speaking at the NCTJ’s Journalism Skills Conference at Bournemouth University, a panel were asked to give advice to journalists, particularly those entering the field.

The panel featured Peter Bale, vice president and general manager of CNN International Digital; Pete Clifton, executive producer for MSN UK; and Liisa Rohumaa, a journalism lecturer at Bournemouth University…

See on www.journalism.co.uk

If you REALLY want to be a journalist – you need the answers to these 10 questions | Multimedia Journalism

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The answers are designed to fully inform you about the state of the journalism trade today in the US and the UK.

See on www.multimedia-journalism.co.uk

How the Internet Can Save Journalism | Ackerman & Ayres Blog | Huff Post

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The sale of the Washington Post to Jeff Bezos is just the most recent episode in the decline and fall of professional journalism. By selling out to a mega-billionaire without any newspaper experience, the Graham family has put a priceless national asset at the mercy of a single outsider. Perhaps Jeff Bezos will use his new plaything responsibly; perhaps not; if not, one of the few remaining sources of serious journalism will be lost.

The crisis in the English-speaking world will turn into a catastrophe in smaller language zones. The English-speaking market is so large that advertisers will pay a lot to gain access to the tens of millions of readers who regularly click onto the New York Times or the Guardian. But the Portuguese-reading public is far too small to support serious journalism on the internet. What happens to Portuguese democracy when nobody is willing to pay for old-fashioned newspapers?

The blogosphere can’t be expected to take up the slack. First-class reporting on national and international affairs isn’t for amateurs. It requires lots of training and lots of contacts and lots of expenses. It also requires reporters with the well-honed capacity to write for a broad audience — something that eludes the overwhelming majority of academic specialists and think-tank policy wonks. And it requires editors who recognize the need to maintain their organization’s long-term credibility when presenting the hot-button news of the day. The modern newspaper created the right incentives, but without a comparable business model for the new technology, blogging will degenerate into a postmodern nightmare — with millions spouting off without any concern for the facts.

We can’t afford to wait for the invisible hand to come up with a new way to provide economic support for serious journalism. To be sure, the financial press has proved moderately successful in persuading readers to pay for online access; and mainstream media are now trying to emulate this success. But if tens of millions of readers don’t succumb to the charms of PayPal — and quickly — now is the time for some creative thinking.

For starters, it would be a mistake to rely on a BBC-style solution. It is one thing for government to serve as a major source of news; quite another to give it a virtual monopoly on reporting. This could mean the death of critical fact-based inquiry when a demagogic government takes power — this risk is especially great in small language zones, where outside media can’t take up the slack.

Enter the Internet news voucher. Under our proposal, each news article on the web will end by asking readers whether it contributed to their political understanding. If so, they can click the yes-box, and send the message to a National Endowment for Journalism — which would obtain an annual appropriation from the government. This money would be distributed to news organizations on the basis of a strict mathematical formula: the more clicks, the bigger the check from the Endowment.

Click headline to read more–

See on www.huffingtonpost.com

Study: Mobile news “snacking” is up sharply, but tablets are the killer news devices

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People are turning to their mobile devices to read news more often than ever before, but they’re spending less time in news apps each time they do so, according to new figures from mobile and Web a…

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Jeff Bezos buys the Washington Post and the media industry goes back to the future

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Jeff Bezos’s acquisition of the Washington Post is another sign of how the mass media industry is shifting back to an earlier model — and if anyone can figure out how to make that model work in a digital age, it’s probably Jeff Bezos.

See on gigaom.com